It’s just not cricket

I’ve written a couple of posts now – here and here – where I’ve mentioned the Duckworth-Lewis method. As I explained in the first of those posts, this is a  statistical approach to the problem of setting runs targets in cricket matches that are interrupted by rain. And at some point, I might write a post discussing a little about the detail of this method.

But you don’t want me to spoil your post-xmas-party hangover with some heavy statistics, right? You’d much prefer it if I spoilt it with some terrible music.

So, ladies and gentleman, I give you…

The Duckworth Lewis method (band)

Really!

If you follow the link to their webpage you will find details of past tours as well as their recent album, Sticky Wickets, which I presume is a cricket-based play on words referring to the Rolling Stones’s Sticky Fingers. The comparison stops there though!

As you might have guessed from both the name of the band and their album title, their songs are mostly – if not all – cricket-related. So if you’re feeling especially brave, and promise not to hold me responsible, try the following.

It’s just not cricket…

 

Enjoy the universe while you can

universe

I’ve mentioned in the past that one of the great things about Statistics is the way it’s a very connected subject. A technique learnt for one type of application often turns out to be relevant for something completely different. But sometimes the connections are just for fun.

Here’s a case in point. A while back I wrote a post making fun of Professor Brian Cox, world renowned astrophysicist, who seemed to be struggling to get to grips with the intricacies of the Duckworth-Lewis method for adjusting runs targets in cricket matches that have been shortened due to poor weather conditions. You probably know, but I forgot to mention, that in his younger days Brian was the keyboard player for D:Ream. You’ll have heard their music even if you don’t recognise the name. Try this for example:

 

Anyway, shortly after preparing that earlier post, I received the following in my twitter feed:

I very much doubt it’s true, but I love the idea that the original version of

Things can only get better

was going to be

Things inexorably get worse, there’s a statistical certainty that the universe will fall to bits and die

Might not have had the same musical finesse, but is perhaps a better statement on the times we live in. Or as Professor Cox put it in his reply: