Borel

borel

Struggling for ideas for Christmas presents? Stuck with an Amazon voucher from your employer and don’t know what to do with it? No idea how you’re going to get through Christmas with the in-laws? Trying to ‘Gamble Responsibly‘ but can’t quite kick the habit?

You can thank me later, but I have the perfect solution for you:

Borel

This is a new Trivial-Pursuit-style board game, but with a twist. Players are given a question involving dice, coloured balls or some other experimental apparatus, and have to bet on the outcome. There’s not enough time to actually do the probability calculations, so you just have to go with intuition. You can make bets of different sizes and, just like in real life, should make bigger bets when you think the odds are more in your favour.

This is part of the description at Amazon:

The game combines the human mind’s difficulty to deal with probabilistic dilemmas with the strategic thinking of competitive gambling.

And:

It is designed to reward probabilistic reasoning, intuition, strategic thinking and risk-taking!

In other words, it’s just like Smartodds-world, but without models to help you.


Disclaimer: The description and reviews look great, and I’ve ordered a set for myself, but I haven’t played it yet. I’ll try it on my family over Christmas and let you know how we get on. If you want a set for yourself or your loved ones, it’s available on Amazon here.

2 thoughts on “Borel

  1. Fabulously named. If you think I can persuade my kids to play a game with the name Bore-l you are Sorel -y mistaken.

    1. Hahaha. What if you tell your kids that Émile Borel – from whom the name is derived – is credited with that thing about a monkey being bound to write the complete works of Shakespeare if you give him a typewriter and an infinite amount of time? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infinite_monkey_theorem) Or failing that, give them this instead?: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hasbro-C0431-Classic-Mousetrap-Game/dp/B06W521R41/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1545078431&sr=8-3&keywords=mousetrap. According to Amazon: “Practice valuable skills in construction, cause and effect and decision-making”. Happy Christmas.

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